Tag Archives: statistics

Homelessness in Los Angeles: Down For the Count?

As for Los Angeles, our city has not lacked in creative, hard working efforts to house its homeless population. In fact, don’t let these homeless numbers fool you. We should be commended for permanently housing so many people.

Homeless Counts: Just Like Counting Sheep?

Four years after my homeless count blog post, sadly, we are still counting individuals and families living out on the streets that have fallen through the cracks of society.

The “Up and Down” Perspectives on Homelessness

With a full stomach and a thankful heart, instead, I am looking at the larger picture of homelessness in America. Whether or not you see the glass as half-full or empty, a broader view on homelessness can be confusing.

Ending Poverty: Is the Solution Just Paying Cash?

If we fail to continue to provide programs that address poverty, more people will end up living on our streets. It’s not as simple as a cash handout. We need to do more.

Legalize Pot, Increase Homelessness

It seems to me that, if every state legalized cannabis, then the incentive to migrate to another state would end.

Where is the Homeless Capital of America?

Which city actually deserves the inglorious distinction of “Homeless Capital of America”? Who is the winner of this human tragedy?… Sadly, the real losers here are the people struggling on our nation’s streets.

Can We Trust the Numbers, More or Less?

For the most visible homeless individuals, at least, the numbers seem to be trending down. More or less.

How Unaffordable Is Child Care for Low-Income Parents?

A bunch of things got me wondering about child care costs. How unaffordable are they for low-income parents who don’t have the benefit of subsidies? The annual survey reports by the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies are the best source of data on affordability I’ve found. So I pulled figures from the latest report — most of them for 2009. Then did some calculations of my own — or more precisely, told Excel to do them. Here’s a summary of key results, plus some Google gleanings about impacts.

Charity Impossible: Do America’s Charities Need Rescuing?

Robert Irvine charges in like a bull in a fine dining establishment, except the restaurant in need of rescuing is not fine. In fact, typically it’s failing. His television show on Food Network, Restaurant: Impossible, showcases Irvine’s talent for reviving dying eateries with a change of interior, menu, branding and, of course, food. At the end of each episode, the nearly-shuttered restaurant becomes a successful, vibrant community eating space. Does the charity world need a similar hero?

How Many Poor People in America? Heritage Foundation Says Darn Few

Seems that the Heritage Foundation has dusted off some old rhetoric and shaped some new data to fit it. Thus it proclaims, much as it did in 2007, that “many of the 30 million Americans defined as ‘poor’ and in need of government assistance” are actually doing very nicely, thank you.

First, a word of clarification. The reference to 30 million is just sloppy blogging. The Foundation’s actual report says “over 30 million.” Technically accurate, but minimizing. The latest Census Bureau income and poverty report tell us that there were nearly 43.6 million people in poverty in 2009.