Tag Archives: statistics

Five Reasons Why Homelessness is Not Discussed in the 2016 Presidential Election

Unlike the topics of foreign policy, or the economy, or education, homelessness is just not a priority among presidential candidates. Here are five reasons why:

LA Homeless Plan: Find Change Here

I see this new homeless plan as a hopeful approach for dealing with an entrenched, decades-old dilemma. Changing the system means changing people’s lives.

Homelessness in Los Angeles: Down For the Count?

As for Los Angeles, our city has not lacked in creative, hard working efforts to house its homeless population. In fact, don’t let these homeless numbers fool you. We should be commended for permanently housing so many people.

Homeless Counts: Just Like Counting Sheep?

Four years after my homeless count blog post, sadly, we are still counting individuals and families living out on the streets that have fallen through the cracks of society.

The “Up and Down” Perspectives on Homelessness

With a full stomach and a thankful heart, instead, I am looking at the larger picture of homelessness in America. Whether or not you see the glass as half-full or empty, a broader view on homelessness can be confusing.

Ending Poverty: Is the Solution Just Paying Cash?

If we fail to continue to provide programs that address poverty, more people will end up living on our streets. It’s not as simple as a cash handout. We need to do more.

Legalize Pot, Increase Homelessness

It seems to me that, if every state legalized cannabis, then the incentive to migrate to another state would end.

Where is the Homeless Capital of America?

Which city actually deserves the inglorious distinction of “Homeless Capital of America”? Who is the winner of this human tragedy?… Sadly, the real losers here are the people struggling on our nation’s streets.

Can We Trust the Numbers, More or Less?

For the most visible homeless individuals, at least, the numbers seem to be trending down. More or less.

How Unaffordable Is Child Care for Low-Income Parents?

A bunch of things got me wondering about child care costs. How unaffordable are they for low-income parents who don’t have the benefit of subsidies? The annual survey reports by the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies are the best source of data on affordability I’ve found. So I pulled figures from the latest report — most of them for 2009. Then did some calculations of my own — or more precisely, told Excel to do them. Here’s a summary of key results, plus some Google gleanings about impacts.