Tag Archives: social services

Homeless Counts: Just Like Counting Sheep?

Four years after my homeless count blog post, sadly, we are still counting individuals and families living out on the streets that have fallen through the cracks of society.

Top 10 Highlights of 2014 in Ending Homelessness

For those of us fighting to end homelessness in America, the year 2014 actually gives us hope that strategic ideas and initiatives are working, albeit slowly. Here are our top highlights of 2014:

“It’s a Hard-Knock Life for Us”: Homeless Children’s Invisibility in U.S. Schools and Beyond

Over a million homeless children in the U.S. (and countless who have not been included in homeless counts) continue to experience “hard-knock” lives. They don’t need a billionaire, like Oliver Warbucks to save them. They need us to collectively unmask hidden issues and create tangible solutions that prevent and end their homelessness. It is not “their” problem to fix. It is all of ours.

A Key? Not Always the Key to Housing

A Key? Not Always the Key to Housing

The “Up and Down” Perspectives on Homelessness

With a full stomach and a thankful heart, instead, I am looking at the larger picture of homelessness in America. Whether or not you see the glass as half-full or empty, a broader view on homelessness can be confusing.

Keeping an Eye on Homelessness

How do we transform a cold gaze into eyes that reflect hope?

Ending Poverty: Is the Solution Just Paying Cash?

If we fail to continue to provide programs that address poverty, more people will end up living on our streets. It’s not as simple as a cash handout. We need to do more.

Homeless Agencies: Growing Bigger and Smaller at the Same Time

Being an agency that grows bigger and smaller at the same time is, in my opinion, a realistic way to ensure effective services.

Refueling a Passion to Address Poverty

I remember my first encounter with extreme poverty.

Selfies With People Who Are Homeless… Really?

Sometimes our efforts to battle homelessness feel like an uphill struggle, especially when society thinks self-portraits next to suffering people are part of a fun, adventurous game.