Tag Archives: politics

Do We Really Need a Homelessness Awareness Week?

We are afraid to admit that the crisis of homelessness is our fault, even though the solution to homelessness is simple: provide housing for everyone.

Does Declaring a Homeless Crisis Mean Calling in the Cavalry?

But calling in the Cavalry to address homelessness simply does not work. Being homeless is not a crime. Any action that might criminalize a person’s state of homelessness simply attracts a civil lawsuit that essentially shuts down a community’s ability to actually help those who need housing, and prevents a community from dealing with those on the streets who are actually breaking real laws.

Homeless Facilities: A Magnet Effect?

To date, we have never had a proposed building turned down. However, the bruises from past community battles still hurt. The misconceptions, the attacks, and the miseducation start as soon as a community gets word that a “homeless program wants to move in.”

Homeless Lives Matter

Alex, who has been homeless for years, should not be worried about being set on fire while he sleeps on the streets. And, he should not be worried about his next meal or where he will sleep tonight.

Five Reasons Why Homelessness is Not Discussed in the 2016 Presidential Election

Unlike the topics of foreign policy, or the economy, or education, homelessness is just not a priority among presidential candidates. Here are five reasons why:

LA Homeless Plan: Find Change Here

I see this new homeless plan as a hopeful approach for dealing with an entrenched, decades-old dilemma. Changing the system means changing people’s lives.

Homelessness Today: That Was Then, This Is Now

After 20 years, the work of ending homelessness is much more difficult. The people we help are much more chronically homeless than before. Our supporters are more jaded. Our community is less compassionate for people who have been on their streets for decades.

Hopeful Resolutions For 2016: A Realistic Approach to Homelessness

Forget shelters, they were simply bandages. Tear those shelter Band-Aids off quickly. The new, and improved solutions to homelessness were supposed to end veteran and chronic homelessness by the end of 2015

Is LA’s Homelessness a State of Crisis or State of Emergency?

I wonder how the 650,000 people in New York and New Jersey who lost their homes during Hurricane Sandy would have responded if government officials had told them to wait a half a year, while they figure out a plan to help them?

But here in Los Angeles, where 44,000 of our neighbors have lost homes and live on our streets, the political power of these people we call “homeless” is so weak that it is okay for our community to put on hold any idea of a “state of emergency.”

American Cities Rank High on Worldwide Homelessness Scale

What does it say when the United States—which has enough funds to build a house for every single person in the country, never mind every person who is homeless in New York City and Los Angeles—allows its citizens to languish on the streets?