Tag Archives: homeless

Monarch School: Bringing the Invisibility of Homeless Youth to Light

“. . . 1 in 45 children experience homelessness in the U.S. each year. That’s over 1.6 million children. While homeless, these youth experience high rates of acute and chronic health problems. The constant barrage of stressful and traumatic experiences also has profound effects on their development and ability to learn.”

Homeless Or Home-Free?

Our first-world society is really the irresponsible party. We let men and women who fight in our wars end up on the streets. We let kids who endure years and years of foster care with loveless families live in alleys or abandoned buildings. So is the case with women encountering domestic violence and seniors struggling with mental health issues.

Shelter For All?

It is truly wonderful that several cities have ended veteran homelessness. However, homelessness has increased in many major jurisdictions – and homelessness encampments continue to appear across our landscape.

Je Suis Homeless

I was homeless.

Brrr… It Is Cold…

Cold weather is fun, unless you are without a home.

Top 10 Highlights of 2014 in Ending Homelessness

For those of us fighting to end homelessness in America, the year 2014 actually gives us hope that strategic ideas and initiatives are working, albeit slowly. Here are our top highlights of 2014:

Home Remedies for Homelessness

We need more creative ideas for how to provide housing for our neighbors who sleep on our streets.

Design Out of Reach: The Best Way to Shoo Homeless People Away

Imagine, however, if the school had a class on how to design public spaces that would drive homeless people away. Although such classes might seem bizarre, such design is actually occurring.

Icy Invasions at Homeless Shelters

If you are lucky enough to have a home, you don’t want a criminal lurking in your neighborhood. And if you’re unlucky enough to be homeless, you don’t want a criminal sleeping next to you in a homeless shelter.

Refueling a Passion to Address Poverty

I remember my first encounter with extreme poverty.